Single Origin or Blend?

A very common question that we get asked is ‘What is the difference between a single origin and a blend?’  The answer is actually fairly simple.  A single origin is a coffee that comes from one specific, location.  The location usually refers to an individual farm, processing station or cooperative but in some more broad definitions it could refer to the country of origin.  Specialty coffee in today’s world is almost always traceable back to the individual producer or farmer.  In fact there is a strong argument that a coffee should not be considered to be ‘specialty grade’ unless it can be traced back accurately.  All of Dimattina’s coffee can be traced back to the original producer.

A blend is (as the name suggests) a mixture of two or more single origin coffees.  Coffee is blended for a number of reasons, both sensory and economical, but the main reason is so the roaster can produce a more balanced and appealing cup of coffee.  It is a bit like a chef combining a number of ingredients to create a dish that is more than the sum of its parts.  Take our Easy St blend for example; we combine two specialty grade single origin coffees (both delicious as standalone coffees) with very different characteristics.  The natural processed Brazil has dominant chocolate biscuity notes and a big body, a great coffee in its own right, but a little lacking in terms of distinctiveness.  Enter the natural Ethiopian.  Ethiopian coffee is known for being extremely unique and varied (it is the birthplace of coffee after all) and naturals stand out especially.  The one we use has very distinct strawberry and blueberry notes.  On their own these flavours can be quite confronting, particularly when drunk with milk; but when paired with the Brazil, the magic starts to happen.  The resulting cup strikes the perfect balance between chocolate and berries, a great combination for your morning brew.  All of our blends are crafted to appeal to different palates and preferences.  Check out the descriptions for more information.